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How Well Do You Know Your Team?

How Well Do You Know Your Team?

How well do you know your team members? Besides knowing their names and generally what their jobs are, do you have a realistic understanding of their workplace challenges, the projects they’re involved with, their professional goals, and their unique skills weaknesses or areas of expertise? No? I understand. It’s tough enough having time to get your own work done much less worry about your team members’ challenges. However, the sooner you understand your team members better, the sooner you’ll relieve some of your workplace stress, you’ll strengthen your workplace relationships, and you’ll see your performance - and your entire team’s performance - improve.

The sooner you understand your team members better, the sooner you’ll relieve some of your workplace stress, you’ll strengthen your workplace relationships, and you’ll see your performance - and your entire team’s performance - improve.

We’ve all heard the saying, “Knowledge is power.” It’s true. The more you know, the better positioned you are to make better, more-informed decisions. This is true when you’re anticipating making a major purchase such as a home or a new vehicle. The more research you do, the more-informed and more confident you are when you finally make that important purchase. However, when it comes to making work and team-related decisions, too often we simply jump to the task at hand and don’t take the time to understand the people with whom we are expected to accomplish great things. Too often, we have a mindset of, “We have too much to do and not enough time to do it. We don’t have time to waste on unproductive, touchy-feely stuff!” We tend to not value the importance of at least taking an initial inventory of our team and its capabilities before we start a project with a new team. We too often don’t proactively identify what our team’s strengths and weaknesses are at the outset so we can anticipate and prepare for probable challenges. Instead, we typically just expect that we’ll ‘work things out’ as the project evolves. That’s somewhat like planning a cross-country road trip without first ensuring your vehicle is up to the challenge, but instead telling yourself, “I’ll figure it out.”

Getting to know your team doesn’t need to be a formal process. In fact, it should be relaxed, conversational, and non-threatening. This is an opportunity to spend time, up-front, sharing information about yourself while allowing your team to better understand each other and your levels of experience and resourcefulness. The more you know about each other, the more you can prepare yourself and the team. Here are just a few questions to ask of each other to help you all get to know each other better:

  • What will your role be on the team?
  • What do you do in other areas of your job? What are your major responsibilities?
  • What do you know and what don’t you know about this project/client/vendor, etc?
  • What experiences (good and bad) have you had with similar situations?
  • What frustrates you about the project/team? What stakeholder concerns you? Why?
  • What special project-related skills do you possess that may not be apparent?
  • What are you not good at doing?
  • What makes you laugh? What makes you angry?
  • How do you perform best (ahead of schedule, lots of collaboration, work alone, work at night, early morning person, etc)?
  • How do you prefer to interact with the other team members?

The more you learn about your team members, the better positioned you are to interact intentionally, effectively, and productively with them.

How well do you know your team?

 

Copyright MMXIX - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com +1.717.597.8890

Liz supports clients with strategic and succession planning, as well as leadership training and executive coaching. Learn more about Liz on LinkedIn!

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on October 22, 2019 in Leadership Development and tagged , ,

 

Do You Believe Your Managers Can Manage?

Do You Believe Your Managers Can Manage?

Do you believe your managers can really manage? Do you believe your managers have the skills to make their own department or team decisions? Do you believe your managers can outline their own department or team projects and budgets? Do you believe your managers can resolve their own team problems and make sound decisions concerning their teams and talent? If you really believed your managers could manage, you wouldn’t be involved in so many of their management-level decisions and actions. You’d trust your managers to manage.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on September 24, 2019 in Leadership Development and tagged , ,

 

Strategic Planning - Understanding Strategic Versus Operational

Strategic Planning - Understanding Strategic Versus Operational

We’re now in the midst of the traditional strategic planning season. Given that, we’re partnering with several organizations whose planning teams are working hard to outline a clear, focused path forward for their respective organizations. For leaders who have previously experienced the strategic planning process, this process can be frustrating, stimulating, demoralizing, and energizing all at the same time. However, for leaders who struggle to comprehend the need to define and capture new strategic initiatives while not documenting and tracking oppressive current operations, the strategic planning process can be perplexing to say the least. Being able to understand and accept the difference in strategic versus complex operational actions is key to successful strategic planning.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on August 20, 2019 in Strategic Planning and tagged ,

 

The Rapidly Diminishing Leadership Skill

The Rapidly Diminishing Leadership Skill

I’m seeing it more and more frequently. In discussions with clients and colleagues, they see it too. This fundamental leadership skill is diminishing in leaders across industries, across generations, and ethnicities. It’s fading less rapidly at the executive level. Several of my clients admit it’s diminishing within their executive teams as well. However, I see it more obviously with mid-level managers.

Managers are losing the ability to stay focused on the task at hand and deliver what is expected.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on July 23, 2019 in Leadership Development and tagged , ,

 

Analyzing Your Leadership Adjectives

Analyzing Your Leadership Adjectives

What can basic random words, adjectives, tell you about your leadership? I believe quite a bit. Let me explain. Last week a colleague and I were discussing various ways to help leaders visualize and internalize specific changes needed to help them, their teams, and their organizations to be even more effective. A simple way to do this is to simply analyze your leadership adjectives. The words used to describe your leadership often describe your leadership challenges.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on June 25, 2019 in Leadership Development and tagged , ,