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Articles tagged "Employee Feedback"

Vicki Hess on The Missing Piece of the Employee Engagement Puzzle

Vicki Hess on The Missing Piece of the Employee Engagement Puzzle

 

Vicki Hess, CSP stopped by today; read as she shares what’s missing in most discussions about employee engagement.

The Missing Piece of the Employee Engagement Puzzle

By Vicki Hess, CSP
Over the last decade, billions of dollars and millions of hours have been invested by organizations across the country to foster greater employee engagement, yet employee disengagement is still at or near all-time highs. Why? Because we’ve been missing a key piece of the engagement puzzle: the employees!

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on March 11, 2014 in Guest Post and tagged , ,

 

Be Careful What You Ask For – You Might Just Get It…

Be Careful What You Ask For – You Might Just Get It…

 

Ron Ashkenas wrote a great blog for Harvard Business Review in 2012 in which he outlines a seemingly obvious fact: Don't Ask for Feedback Unless You Want It. His perfectly titled article highlights the obvious blunders other leaders make by asking for others’ comments, input, or feedback, yet being irritated when they receive it. The hypocrisy of their actions is blatant. But what I most appreciate about Ashkenas’ article is his honesty in stating,

“These behaviors, by the way, are much easier to see in other people than in ourselves.”

Oops.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on March 4, 2014 in Leadership Development and tagged , , ,

 

No Appraisals? OK. But How Will You Keep It Fair?

No Appraisals? OK. But How Will You Keep It Fair?

 

I've recently had interesting conversations with a few organizations that want my company to work with them in developing their leaders. That's great but we're running into an initial roadblock as each company's leadership team has basically said, "We're hearing more and more that performance appraisals are a thing of the past. They're demoralizing, time-consuming, and ineffective. No one here likes to do them, so as a leadership team, we've decided we're not going to do them anymore." That's fine. And by the way, that's very trendy.

However, let's think about the reality of this type of personnel management strategy. If you as a leadership team decide to no longer use an objective performance review system that aligns performance to your organization's values and goals, how do you plan to ensure there are no surprises for your employees or management team?

How do you plan to keep things fair?

By keeping things fair I mean, what's your plan to ensure:

  • your employees know clearly and specifically what is expected of them (What's expected of them not only before they were hired, but while they're on the job, and also going forward)?
  • your leadership team is continuously providing feedback to employees on what each employee and team is doing well to drive the organization forward and what areas are starting to be a concern?
  • your human resources team has the appropriate and adequate documentation to address any legal actions that may be taken by disgruntled or terminated employees?

No Appraisals? OK. But How Will You Keep It Fair?If you are one of the fortunate few organizations that has an established culture where every employee just "gets it," and knows and does the right things day in and day, you may not need a performance review and planning system. However, if your organization is like most, you probably deal with personnel "issues" small or large on a regular basis. So my question to you is: Are you eliminating performance reviews because you really don't need them, or are you eliminating them because as an organization and leadership team, you've never created and used them effectively before?  If your organization views them as punitive, you've not managed their use correctly. If your organization views them as a collaborative planning and development tool, why are you doing away with them?

So again, if you don't want to use performance appraisals, fine.  But what's your plan to keep things fair?

 

Copyright MMXIII - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com +1.717.597.8890

Liz supports clients with strategic and succession planning, as well as leadership training and executive coaching. Learn more about Liz on LinkedIn!

 

 

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on February 19, 2013 in Leadership Development and tagged , , , ,

 

Grow Your Business Through Your Employees Not Your Customers

Grow Your Business Through Your Employees Not Your Customers

You've cut prices, you've refined your target customer base, you've increased your advertising and still --- business is so slow it's dangerous. The economy is not good, but other companies seem to be selling similar products and services. How are they able to survive (and yes, thrive) while your sales are tanking? They've focused on growing their businesses through their employees, instead of through their customers alone.

Successful companies have realized that if they better educate, train, and communicate with their employees on 'the business', their organization's bottom line will likely improve. Why? Better informed and better trained employees are able to generate sales. They're able to identify ways to improve processes, and to discover ways to reduce costs. Regardless of title or position, everyone in the organization can now contribute to growing 'the business'.

Every employee, at every level of your organization is a potential sales person. Every employee is a potential manager and leader. Every employee is a potential process engineer. But your employees can't reach their potential, until they've been given information, training, and guidance to make that potential a reality.

Who better to learn the entire production process than the people on the line? Why not teach them how enhancements to their process can positively impact the rest of the line?

Who better to learn project management than the people who have been gathering the data for the project? Why not teach them how to marry the data with real- world applications?

Who better to study the deep demographics of your customers than your front-line tellers? Why not teach them how to quickly identify customer segments and then use the appropriate cross-selling techniques?

Grow Your Business Through Your Employees Not Your CustomersAt a bare minimum, if your employees wear company shirts, jackets, or uniforms, recognize that they are your passive sales team. They're walking billboards for your organization. Therefore, it's critical these employees understand 'the business' and can explain it to others.

I recently suggested to one of my clients that he and his senior staff wear their company shirts to any Rotary, Chamber, Lions, business or community function. The owner thought the idea was rather weak. However, that night he wore his company shirt to an after-work community fund-raiser. The woman he sat next to commented on his shirt. My client explained what his company provided, and walked away with her card. The next day, he followed up with her -- and received a large purchase order. My client has since scheduled more training for all of his employees, he now includes product and services briefings in his regular production meetings, and -- he's ordered more shirts!

Don't limit your growth by focusing exclusively on your customers. Leverage your business through your employees. 'Grow' your employees, and they'll grow your business.

 

Copyright MMIII - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com +1.717.597.8890

Liz supports clients with strategic and succession planning, as well as leadership training and executive coaching. Learn more about Liz on LinkedIn!

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on March 6, 2012 in Leadership Development and tagged , , , ,

 

Be Fair and Share

Be Fair and Share

Are you being fair with your managers? Are you sharing critical information with them in a timely manner? Are you developing performance standards for them and the company and then not sharing those standards with them? If you answered, "Yes, Yes, and No" that's great. But stop and really think about your answers.

You'd be surprised at how many business owners and managers aren't being fair and are not sharing critical information with their own managers -- and don't realize it.

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on February 7, 2012 in Leadership Development and tagged , , , ,