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Are You Asking Enough of Your Managers?

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Are You Asking Enough of Your Managers?Are you frustrated with your managers, supervisors, or project managers?

  • Do they blame others when budgets are blown and deadlines are missed?
  • Do they point fingers when their teams are deadlocked over problems?
  • Do they throw their hands up in frustration when their team's internal conflicts get in the way of servicing the customers?

If so, are you asking enough of your managers? Or let me put it this way: Are you being clear enough with your managers as to what you really expect of them?

A common problem many in leadership positions face is being able to clarify what they 'really' need their managers, supervisors, and project managers to do.

Often managers, supervisors, and project managers incorrectly believe their job is to do the specific, itemized tasks listed in their position descriptions or on their work orders or on other project lists. Yes, those tasks need to get done. But those are expected. Those are the basics. Those are the bare minimum requirements any manager, supervisor, or project manager is expected to be able to do -- and do well. That's what they're being paid to do.

home.jpgHowever, what most new or less-than-effective managers, supervisors, and project managers don't realize, is what the leadership team really expects of them. And that's taking ownership of the problems, confusion, frustrations, and other issues their teams face that cause delays or roadblocks in their ability to get their work done. Taking ownership doesn't mean taking all of the blame personally. It means taking the individual responsibility and initiative to identify, address, and clear the roadblocks the team is facing, struggling with, over-analyzing, under-analyzing, over-emphasizing, exaggerating, or completely missing.  Whatever the issue is that's creating a roadblock to the team's successful performance, it's the manager's responsibility to clear it.

So if it's an equipment problem, the manager needs to be available to help determine or approve the needed fixes. If it's an undefined problem, the manager needs to be available to help determine the root cause and determine the best solution. If it's a personality-clash between team members, the manager needs to address that issue as well. Whatever is creating a distraction or other problem for the team, it's the manager's job to deal with it, clear it, and allow the team to move on and to succeed.

So if you're frustrated with your managers, are you asking enough of them?

Do they know what you really expect of them? Do they know you expect them to take ownership of their team and its problems?

 

Copyright MMXII Liz Weber, CMC, CSP - Weber Business Services, LLC.

 

Liz Weber CMCLiz Weber, CMC CSP

Liz Weber coaches, consults, and trains leadership teams. She specializes in strategic and succession planning, and leadership development.

Liz is one of fewer than 100 people in the U.S. to hold both the Certified Management Consultant (CMC) and Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) designations.

Contact Liz’s office at +1.717.597.8890 for more info on how Liz can help you, or click here to have Liz’s office contact you.


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2 thoughts on “Are You Asking Enough of Your Managers?”

  1. Liz,
    You have touched on something that I say constantly, people cannot observe your expectations (or your intentions). Communicate, clarify, coach, .... if you expect your expectations to be met.

    Sure there are some employees who are highly intuitive or a perfect random match for you and your expectations. However most need clear communication and reinforcement.

    This post is a great call to action for leaders everywhere.
    Kate

  2. Thanks Kate - What a great quote: Communicate, clarify, coach, …. if you expect your expectations to be met. I think that's Tweetable!

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Posted by Liz Weber CMC on October 23, 2012 in Leadership Development and tagged , , , , ,